New Wave Furniture – Granny’s bane. Our gain

What goes through your mind when see a conspicuous piece of furniture in a home, “Woah that’s beautiful”, “Where did they get that?” and “Mine is better” are quite likely. Especially the last one. Our self centred selves are really quite charming. Anyway, the point is, there’s not much to gaze at about conventional furniture, unless it’s brilliantly made. And yet, we’re all for antiquated, positively ancient furniture. What we need is change. Sweet, delicious change with a side of smooth modernity. And ho ho ho, it’s finally coming. Who knew it’s Christmas already. So, this wave of furniture revolution I’ve been rambling about. “What is it,” I hear the enlightened reader ask. Excellent question, I appear to reply. Essentially what we’re looking at is

Mango Magnifique – Exotic Furniture Closer to Home

You probably have a jar of mango chutney in your fridge. Incidentally, I do so too. More incidentally, so do 6 million of us in the UK. I don’t blame us; the stuff is delicious. Pork tenderloin, naan or regular old curries, mango chutneys go with just about anything (except tide pods, but they’re not meant to be eaten anyway. Take note, YouTube). With my skills of deduction, I’ve found that mango chutney is in fact made of man-goes, which in turn grow on mango trees. Sherlock who? The Unsung Underdog – Speaking of mango trees, these little hunks of cellulose don’t get much attention. It’s like being the big brother of the genius Oxford graduates who also happens to be a two-sport star; sure,

Opulent Oak – Furniture at its Best

The Whomping Willow from Harry Potter is quite possibly the most famous tree in history. Granted, it’s (arguably) fiction, but that’s not about to stop it from being more famous than probably all of us combined. Murderous tendencies aside, it’s the willow that young willows strive to be. Other tree younglings are not fortunate enough to have role models as famous as the Whomping Willow, but it’s easy to see why Oaks don’t particularly need one. These guys grow into semi-literal tree monsters – 50 feet high, 10 feet wide, tough as a day old pancakes – the whole package. Oak wood is, somewhat obviously, quite valuable. After yielding a ridiculously tough chopping process – think 3 feet stainless steel chainsaw tough – Oaks give

Elizabethan Enthusiasm and Contemporary Contention

Is the Westminster Abbey better looking than the Shard? Do Nokias rock more than iPhones? Ford or Tesla? While unlikely to be asked by a sane person in real life (Of course, Tesla is better. Just kidding), these questions probably show that we have quite different preferences when it comes to New vs. Old. Whether we prefer the old classics or newfangled contemporaries, it’s hard to argue that we have plenty of choice nowadays thanks to our old (new?) friend the internet. Except, of course, if you want 14th century gummy bears. Those are surprisingly hard to find. Oldy Goldies vs. Newfangled Newbies – In furniture as well you find basically two groups of customers – The Oldy Goldies and the Newfangled Newbies. They, quite

Amazonians to Amazon

The Romans (and possibly the mythological Amazonians) built roads in 800 CE. Not particularly good ones, no doubt, but roads nonetheless. Fun fact: most of said roads survive today, not bad for a bunch of half-naked people without machines 2000 years ago. Roads were the first – admittedly tiny – step towards efficient transport. It cut transport time drastically, for the era, of course, and we could finally transport something from A to B in the foreseeable future. The snakes, potholes, and frankly copious numbers of incompetent “thieves” didn’t make their lives any easier, but it was still better than trekking snakier, more pothole-y terrain with slightly less incompetent thieves. Imagine that…. What Watt? – So started transport. We moved from thieves ridden windy roads

The Brick Conundrum

Quick, when’s the last time you went to a physical store for anything besides groceries? If you’re anything like the rest of the British population, the answer is likely to be ‘‘When we didn’t have roads blocked by snow, thank you very much’’, followed by a disapproving ‘tut’. On a more serious note, only about 13% of Brits haven’t bought anything online in the past year, a shockingly low-yet somewhat unsurprising number. The Brick Wars and Mortar Shelling – These statistics are the key to the problem faced by Brick and Mortar stores around the country. The ‘Brick Conundrum’, as I like to call it. Sky high internet penetration coupled with exceeding efficient shipping – we’re looking at you, Amazon – has led to great

The Mainstream Furniture Zeitgeist

I have a £75 Ikea table next to me as I write this. For purely research purposes, I decided to subject it to a “strength” test. (I totally didn’t do the “test” to give myself an excuse to get a new table). After a few minutes of destructive tinkering, let’s just say Ikea doesn’t make the sturdiest stuff (go figure). The layers of wood practically escorted themselves out of my table like they were suspiciously meant not to stay together. Granted, Ikea is supposed to be cheap and effective. But Cheap I can vouch for; effective, on the other hand, not so much. This little experiment shows one crucial fact about “value” furniture stores – the cost at which they sell is not nearly enough

Brick and Mortar in The Furniture Sector

The Brick Conundrum Quick, what’s the last time you went to a physical store for anything besides groceries? If you’re anything like the rest of the British population, the answer is likely to be ‘‘When we didn’t have roads blocked by snow, thank you very much’’, followed by a disapproving ‘tut’. On a more serious note, only about 13% of Brits haven’t bought anything online in the past year, a shockingly low-yet somewhat unsurprising number. The Brick Wars and Mortar Shelling These statistics are the key to the problem faced by Brick and Mortar stores around the country. The ‘Brick Conundrum’, as I like to call it. Sky high internet penetration coupled with exceeding efficient shipping – we’re looking at you, Amazon – has led